Medical Transcription Online Course

Distance Learning Career Training/ Online Course of 12 Lessons

Health Care, Nutrition, & Fitness > Medical Transcription

Course Description
Instructor Biography
Syllabus
Course Objectives
Certificate Requirements
Start Dates
PDF Brochure
Who Should Attend
PC Requirements
Recommended Courses
Student Reviews
FAQ

Medical Transcription Online Course

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Take your first step toward a lucrative career as a medical transcriptionist! In this course, you'll learn how to transcribe the most common medical reports used in both inpatient and outpatient settings. We'll review a lot of the grammar you might have forgotten since high school and apply it to the reports. This knowledge will help prepare you to work almost anywhere in the medical field—doctors' offices, clinics, public health facilities, and hospitals. With this foundation, you'll be set to advance your education so you can work as a subcontractor for a company that outsources transcription, or you can eventually even take on your own clients—all from the comfort of your own home.

We'll go through each of the nine main report types—their formatting requirements, the components of each one, and how they are used in the clinical setting. We'll review grammar points in every lesson, pointing out important elements that will make your reports perfect. You'll also gain important clinical knowledge of major disease processes that are essential to enhance your skill as a medical documentation specialist.

Along the way, we'll download a free transcriber that you'll use to listen to dictation, and we'll cover how to use it to produce the reports in your word processor. These hands-on exercises will give you the practice you'll need to determine if this field is for you. We'll also go through the options you'll have now and in the future by developing the skills of a medical transcriptionist.

 
Study Options
This course is an online course. You can access your course materials, and submit all of your question papers to your personal tutor, online from anywhere in the World using your unique student account.
Demo

Click here to view a course demonstration.

Fee

$125.00 USD

Length

6 Weeks

Qualifications

Certificate of Completion

What's Included
  • Study Guide
  • Full Tutor and Admin support
  • Registration and Certification

Instructor

This course includes a knowledgeable and caring instructor who will guide you through your lessons, facilitate discussions, and answer your questions.

The instructor for this course will be Jennifer Della'Zanna

 Have a question about this course? Contact a representative

 

   
 

By the end of this course, you'll know the basic report types, have clinical knowledge of major diseases, be able to correct grammar from dictated reports on the fly, and know the next steps you'll need to take!


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INSTRUCTOR BIOGRAPHY

Medical Transcription CourseJennifer Della'Zanna graduated from Albright College in Reading, PA with a Bachelor of Arts degree. With 15 years' experience in the health care industry, she has worked as a medical transcriptionist, receptionist, medical assistant, practice administrator, biller, and coding specialist. She has written and edited courses and study guides on medical coding, transcription, and using technology in health care. She regularly writes feature articles about health issues for online and print publications. Jennifer is a member of the American Academy of Professional Coders and the Association for Healthcare Documentation Integrity.

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SYLLABUS

All courses run for six weeks, with a two-week grace period at the end. Two lessons are released each week for the six-week duration of the course. You do not have to be present when the lesson is released, but you must complete each lesson within two weeks of its release.

A new section of each course starts on the second or third Wednesday of each month. If enrolling in a series of two or more courses, please be sure to space the start date for each course at least two months apart.

Week One
Wednesday - Lesson 01
    In this first lesson, we'll look at the history of medical transcription as a career. You'll find out how the field has evolved into its modern form, and you'll explore the various skills and aptitudes that you'll need to succeed as a professional medical transcriptionist. You'll examine the type of work MTs produce, and we'll take a look at the MT's job today, where you might work, and what might be in store in the future for those working in this career field.
Friday - Lesson 02

    We'll start today by discussing the MT's tools of the trade. We'll review a few of the reference books and discuss the types of Web sites that MTs use for research. Then we'll take a look at the hardware and software that today's MTs use on the job. I'll talk you through downloading the free software we'll use in this course, and then we'll go through a quick tour on how to use it. By the end of this lesson, you'll be sitting at your computer, listening to a real medical dictation audio file and looking at the Express Scribe software on your screen. As you listen to the medical report, you'll practice starting, pausing, and rewinding the audio as you tap away on the keyboard.
Week Two
Wednesday - Lesson 03
    There are nine report types that medical professionals use most often in both hospitals and clinics. So in this lesson we'll go over a variety of examples of real medical reports. We'll also do a quick review of medical correspondence. Medical letters aren't much different from traditional letters, but since you might not have typed a traditional letter in a while, you might need a refresher. We'll finish the lesson with some specific tips about pathology reports and how to handle numbers and measurements. Then you'll practice transcribing a medical letter and a pathology report.


Friday - Lesson 04
We'll spend this lesson going over how to listen most effectively, discussing the difference between hearing and active listening. We'll also touch on many of the issues that keep voice recognition systems from replacing humans, including homonyms, synonyms, and antonyms. Then we'll discuss how you can use phonetics and vowel sounds (as well as a few other tricks!) to help you figure out a word or phrase in a muddled recording. Then we'll talk a bit about the radiology department and radiology reports, and we'll finish up by practicing transcribing one in today's assignment.

Week Three
Wednesday - Lesson 05
    Today we're going to talk about some subjects that might make you cringe a little: grammar, sentence structure, and punctuation. But I promise this will be a painless, maybe even enjoyable, journey through some of the basic principles of writing that will help you become a better MT. Then, in our Practice Corner, we'll talk a little more about SOAP notes and then turn our attention to infectious diseases and medications. You'll also have the chance to transcribe a SOAP note and a radiology report in the assignment that accompanies the lesson.


Friday - Lesson 06
    We'll continue our examination of writing in this lesson by talking about style from the MT's perspective. When you're transcribing, you must follow editorial directions in spelling, capitalization, and typographical display. And it's those directions that are the style MTs need to be concerned about. I think you'll be surprised at how many different ways you can treat a single word. Should it be capitalized or lowercased? Should you abbreviate it, or should you spell it out? Should your numbers be in digit form or word form? These are the issues we'll be covering in this lesson. Finally, in our Practice Corner, we'll focus on the H&P report, and you'll have the chance to practice transcribing one.


Week Four
Wednesday - Lesson 07
    No matter what you transcribe, one thing is a given: Medical terminology will be a huge part of it. That's what we'll be focusing on today. One thing to remember is that dictators aren't perfect. They might say one word when they actually mean another. Or they might say a word that has a sound-alike word, like cystitome and cystotome. If you have a good understanding of medical terminology, you can pinpoint the correct word to make sure your transcription is accurate. Then, in our Practice Corner, I'll review the basic nature of heart disease and its treatment. We'll also take a close look at another common disease: diabetes.


Friday - Lesson 08
    A critical component of the MT's work is the way you put your reports together. So in this lesson, we'll talk about how to break up your reports into sections with headings, subheadings, special line spacing, page breaks, and other formatting niceties. We'll also take a closer look at ways you can make your work easier by using word processing shortcuts, AutoText, macros, and templates. Mastering them will make you a faster and more efficient MT! In the Practice Corner, we'll focus on surgical reports. Surgical terminology is important to know, and it's also fascinating to take an inside look at what goes on in the operating room. The assignment for this lesson will include a surgical report to help you put to work all the new knowledge you've gained.
Week Five
Wednesday - Lesson 09
    Another essential step in transcription is editing and proofreading your work. And that's what we'll concentrate on today. I'll start off by sharing some editing do's and don'ts as well as what to look for when you're proofreading. In our Practice Corner, we'll be covering a disease process that has, in some way, touched virtually everyone: cancer. Once you have an overview of cancer, we'll work on the consultation report. Physicians often ask specialists to further evaluate their patients, especially cancer patients. So this is a common report that you're likely to transcribe regularly. The assignment for this lesson includes a consult report to transcribe, and you'll also get to practice proofreading.


Friday - Lesson 10
    So far we've focused on the mechanical elements of medical transcription. But there is still a lot you need to know about clinical issues. So this will be a completely clinical lesson. We'll talk about classification systems and their transcription foibles. And now that you have the bones of grammar and style down, we're going to talk about some real bones. We'll begin by discussing information on fractures and spine levels. Finally, in our Practice Corner, we'll discuss discharge and death summaries. They are very similar reports, but we'll take a look at some of their subtle differences.
Week Six
Wednesday - Lesson 11
    This lesson will be similar to the last in that it covers lots of clinical issues. It won't all be clinical, however. There are a few miscellaneous things that I want to make sure I share with you. They don't really fit into neat categories, so I've put them all here. Once we finish with these miscellaneous items, we'll jump back into some clinical issues. We'll be talking specifically about infections. Then we'll turn our attention to smaller parts of the body—cells and blood. Then, in our Practice Corner, you'll see how everything you've learned can come together in an autopsy report. This is probably the longest, most comprehensive report you'll ever come across. And, of course, you'll have the chance to transcribe an autopsy report in the assignment!


Friday - Lesson 12

    By now you have the tools and the knowledge you need to dip your toe into the waters of medical transcription. But we still have a couple of big questions to answer. How do you manage your workload? Also, how do you establish yourself as a medical transcriptionist? And do you need more training? Today we'll discuss all the different ways you can work—everything from being an independent contractor all the way up to consultant work. We'll talk about additional training as well. Then we'll take a peek at some of the events on the horizon, and you'll see why this is an exciting time to enter the transcription field. For our final Practice Corner, we'll look at the Health Story Project. It's an initiative to develop standards for integrating narrative reports (like the ones you've been transcribing) into the electronic medical record in a meaningful way—giving them the ability to be searched and to extrapolate data like we have never been able to do before.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

    Lesson 1

    Explore the various skills and aptitudes that you'll need to succeed as a medical transcriptionist.

    Lesson 2

    Learn about the reference books and computer hardware and software that the MT needs, and download transcription software.

    Lesson 3

    Understand the nine kinds of inpatient and outpatient medical reports an MT transcribes.

    Lesson 4

    Learn how to use phonetics and vowel sounds to figure out words and phrases.

    Lesson 5

    See how grammar and punctuation rules can help you untangle twisted sentences, and learn the ins and outs of medications.

    Lesson 6

    Find out about style rules governing capitalization, abbreviations, and numbers, and study the details of the H&P report.

    Lesson 7

    Discover the basics of spelling in medical terminology, and learn how to transcribe elements relating to heart disease and diabetes.

    Lesson 8

    Master shortcuts to improve transcribing efficiency, and discover the inner workings of the operating room.

    Lesson 9

    Learn editing and proofreading tips to eliminate errors from your transcriptions, and grow in your knowledge of cancer.

    Lesson 10

    Distinguish between classification systems, and learn the details of the discharge and death summaries.

    Lesson 11

    Understand transcription issues related to infections, blood, and cells, and learn how to transcribe an autopsy report.

    Lesson 12

    Choose from the different ways in which you can work as an MT.

     

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CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS

A 65% or better must be achieved in order to receive a Certificate of Completion.

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START DATES

Jan 15, 2014 | Feb 19, 2014 | Mar 19, 2014 | Apr 16, 2014 | May 21, 2014 | Jun 18, 2014 | Jul 16, 2014 | Aug 20, 2014 | Sep 17, 2014 | Oct 15, 2014 | Nov 12, 2014 | Dec 10, 2014

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PDF BROCHURE

Please click here to download the PDF brochure for over 300 ed2go online courses offered by eLearn Canada.

This brochure and the registration form for this course require Adobe Reader. Click here to download the latest version of Adobe Reader.

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WHO SHOULD ATTEND

It is recommended that students have prior knowledge of medical terminology and touch-typing before enrolling in this course.

PC REQUIREMENTS

Internet access, e-mail, the Microsoft Internet Explorer or Mozilla Firefox Web browser, and the Adobe Flash and PDF plug-ins (two free and simple downloads you obtain at http://www.adobe.com/downloads by clicking Get Adobe Flash Player and Get Adobe Reader).

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  • STUDENTS REVIEWS

    Reviews coming soon! Please check back next month.

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    FAQ

    Q: How are your courses different from other online courses?

    A: Two words: customer satisfaction. A genuine ed2go course is more than just a collection of project-oriented lessons, stimulating quizzes, and hands-on assignments. Our instructors are famous for their ability to create warm and supportive communities of learners. It's no wonder that many long-lasting friendships have formed in our lively and intelligent discussion areas. Our satisfaction and completion rates are among the highest in our industry, with more than 95% of our students indicating that they'd like to take another ed2go online course. And we've served 750,000 students over the last eight years--far more than anyone else in our industry. But don't take our word for it--see for yourself. Browse our Course Catalog and read the fantastic things students have to say about our courses.


    Q: How long are your courses?

    A: Unless otherwise specified, all courses run for six weeks. You will be granted access to two lessons each week for six weeks. Each lesson will be accompanied by a short, multiple-choice quiz, and some lessons may also include a hands-on assignment. You are expected to try and complete each quiz and assignment within two weeks from when the lesson is released. The course will conclude with a final exam. You will have two weeks from the day the final exam is released to complete your studies and submit the final exam for evaluation.


    Q: What happens if I'll be away on business/vacation during part of the class?

    A: No problem! There's a two-week grace period built right into each of our quizzes and final exams. As long as you can live with that two week time frame, you can read each lesson at your leisure, and complete each assignment when it is convenient for you. That's the beauty of taking an online course--they're designed to fit your schedule--not your instructor's!

    If you start to fall behind, we can grant you a ten day extension at the end of the course. You are not required to attach a reason to your extension request, but we can grant no more than one extension per course. You will be given instructions on how to request an extension when your course begins.


    Q: How will I receive my lessons, quizzes and assignments?

    A: Each course comes complete with an online classroom. You will be able to use your web browser to access the online classroom and obtain your course material and communicate with your instructor.


    Q: What happens if I have a question?

    A: Each of your lessons is accompanied by an interactive discussion area. When you need help with a lesson, all you have to do is post your question or inquiry in the appropriate course discussion area, where the instructor , his or her teaching assistant, or one of your fellow students will respond.


    Q: May I respond to other students' discussion area questions?

    A: We are firmly convinced that the best way to learn a new skill is to teach it to others. If you know the answer to a discussion area question, you are strongly encouraged to offer your assistance.


    Q: When we miss a question on the quiz, you tell us why we missed it, but you don't tell us the right answer. Why not?

    A: Our quizzes use a diminishing multiple choice format. When you miss a question, you will receive an explanation as to why your answer was incorrect. You are then expected to do the research needed to find the correct answer. You will retain the material much better if you take the responsibility for answering our questions instead of relying on us to answer them for you.


    Q: How is taking an Internet course different from reading a computer book?

    A: Like books, much of the information in our Internet courses will be conveyed to you in writing. But the similarities between books and our Internet workshops end there. In particular:

    • We believe that computer skills are best acquired by coupling hands-on experience with information and expert advice. Each of our lessons comes complete with a quiz that has been carefully designed to reinforce the material covered in your lesson. Each quiz will be evaluated instantly and returned to you with meaningful feedback. In addition, many of your lessons will be accompanied with meaningful assignments that have been expertly crafted to give you practical hands-on experience with the material covered in your course. After you complete each assignment, you will be provided with all the information you need to self-evaluate your work and assess your own strengths and weaknesses.

    • Whats more, our courses are crafted to exploit the interactive nature of the Internet, virtually ensuring that all of your course-related questions are answered. During the course, you will remain in constant contact with your instructor and your fellow students. Although most computer books are great at feeding you expert advice, none can give you the practical experience and level of interaction delivered by just one of our courses.

    • Since most books are written many months before they are published, much of the material you find in books is out-of-date by the time they hit the store shelves. The dynamic and interactive nature of our courses makes it easy for you to receive up-to-the-minute instructions and advice from your instructor and classmates whenever you want it. This makes our online courses as timely, topical, and relevant to your needs as today's newspaper.


    Q: How is taking an Internet course different from classroom instruction?

    A: In todays fast-paced world, many of us find it difficult to take time away from work and family to attend school. One of the primary advantages of our Internet workshops is that you can "attend class" in the comfort and convenience of your own home and office. All you have to do is log into your online classroom when you are good and ready to read your lessons, complete your quizzes and assignments, or communicate with your instructor and fellow students. Our Internet courses fit into your schedule: you can take them before breakfast, during lunch, late at night, or at any other time you find convenient--the choice is yours!

     

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